Twenty two. Mount Holyoke College. Queer.
Likes: Hipsters, History, Music & Laughs.
Dislikes: Social Interaction & Productivity.

 

archaicwonder:

Sorbie Tower, Scotland
This little known, rubble built tower, known originally as the “Old Place of Sorbie” dates to the late 16th century, and was built by the Clan Hannay. The ruins are 1 mile east of the village of Sorbie in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.
More about Sorbie Tower (with a reconstruction)

archaicwonder:

Sorbie Tower, Scotland

This little known, rubble built tower, known originally as the “Old Place of Sorbie” dates to the late 16th century, and was built by the Clan Hannay. The ruins are 1 mile east of the village of Sorbie in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

More about Sorbie Tower (with a reconstruction)

Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.

Albert Einstein (via thesugarelephantcafe)


Illustration from ‘An ABZ of Love,’ Kurt Vonnegut’s favorite vintage Danish guide to sexuality. (x)

Illustration from ‘An ABZ of Love,’ Kurt Vonnegut’s favorite vintage Danish guide to sexuality. (x)

(Source: callianeira)

mango-popsicle:

FRANCE: PHOTOGRAPHY & ART DIRECTION: JULIEN PALAST

Find Julien Palast and MP on Facebook here and here.

(Source: mango-popsicle)

archaicwonder:

Dounreay Castle, Scotland
Dounreay Castle dates from the late 16th century, and is one of the few remaining examples of a Scottish Laird’s castle from that period. William Sinclair of Dunbeath, descended from a younger brother of John Sinclair, third Earl of Caithness, built the castle in the 1560s. It was damaged in 1651 by Oliver Cromwell’s New Model Army during their Scottish campaign. Now entirely ruined, the castle was still inhabited in 1863, but had become roofless and derelict by 1889. The castle is on the north coast of Caithness, in the Highland area of Scotland.

archaicwonder:

Dounreay Castle, Scotland

Dounreay Castle dates from the late 16th century, and is one of the few remaining examples of a Scottish Laird’s castle from that period. William Sinclair of Dunbeath, descended from a younger brother of John Sinclair, third Earl of Caithness, built the castle in the 1560s. It was damaged in 1651 by Oliver Cromwell’s New Model Army during their Scottish campaign. Now entirely ruined, the castle was still inhabited in 1863, but had become roofless and derelict by 1889. The castle is on the north coast of Caithness, in the Highland area of Scotland.